300: Rise of an Empire

If you thought 300 couldn’t possibly have a sequel due to the demise of Russell Crowe’s character (like my coworker did), you would be incorrect.

            300: Rise of an Empire is Noam Murro’s first big-screen film. It features the writing of Zach Snyder, who directed its predecessor. This, no doubt, enhances stylistic and plot continuity, while allowing Murro to shine as he polishes the storyline, the cinematography, the battle scenes, and more.

            Rise opens with a flashback of Russel Crowe’s death from the first movie. The Photoshop used to make the scene from the older movie appear three dimensional is comical, because apparently the best that the filmmakers could do was emphasize the horse trampling on the bodies (including Russel Crowe’s), so the animal was seemingly floating across a flat background of severed bodies. Such is the case with the rest of the film’s 3-D formatting – it was either poor or (more likely) not noticeable. (I didn’t mind much, because my friends and I still got to take silly pictures with the glasses after the movie was over)

            Rise was an improvement on its already-entertaining predecessor. While the acting is average to poor, with a bit of brilliance from Themistocles (Sullivan Stapleton), rounder characters, such as Eva Green’s Artemisia (who wore the coolest costumes), kept the conventional plot interesting. I’m not a person who hates dialogue-driven films – obviously – but the simpler language in this film made it easier to focus on the battle scenes, the main focus of the film. The first movie was a bit too “talky,” and I was glad to see this one simplifying the plot and strengthening the action scenes to create an overall more striking movie.

             The battle scenes in the second movie are indisputably better than the first. The Spartans fought on water, with Viking ships and cool maneuvers—a welcome change from the stumbling, entirely land-dwelling action scenes of the first 300. The dark sky and ocean behind the ships added to the climate of despair and mystery.

            This is a very enjoyable film to see with friends, or perhaps a quality time-killer for a rainy Sunday afternoon. At any rate, I recommend it to fans of historically-styled action flicks.

300: Rise Of An Empire

If you think 300 couldn’t possibly have a sequel because of the demise of Russell Crowe’s character – as my coworker did—you, like him, would be wrong.

            300: Rise of an Empire is Noam Murro’s first big-screen film. It features the writing of Zach Snyder, who directed the first 300 movie. This, no doubt, enhances stylistic and plot continuity, while allowing Murro to shine as he polishes the storyline, the cinematography, the battle scenes, and more.

            Rise opens with a flashback of Russel Crowe’s death from the first movie. The Photoshop used to make the scene from the older movie appear three dimensional was comical, because apparently the best they could do was emphasize the horse trampling on the bodies, including Russell Crowe’s, in the scene, so the animal was seemingly floating across a flat background of bloody, lifeless bodies. Such was the case with the rest of the 3-D – it was either poor or (more likely) not noticeable. I didn’t mind much, because my friends and I still got to take silly pictures with the glasses after the movie was over.

            Rise was an improvement on its already-entertaining predecessor. Though the acting was average to poor, with some points of brilliance on the part of Themistocles (Sullivan Stapleton), rounder characters, such as Eva Green’s Artemisia (who wore the coolest costumes), kept the conventional plot interesting. I’m not a person who hates dialogue-driven films – obviously – but the simpler language in this film made it easier to focus on the battle scenes, which is what I believe the movie is trying to showcase. The first movie was a bit too “talky,” and I was glad to see this one simplifying the plot and strengthening the action scenes to create an overall more striking film.

             The battle scenes in the second movie were indisputably better than the first. The Spartans fought on water, with Viking ships and cool maneuvers, a welcome change from the stumbling, entirely land-dwelling action scenes of the first 300. The dark sky and ocean behind the ships added to the climate of despair and mystery.

            This is quite an enjoyable movie, which allows you to simultaneously turn off your mind and still appreciate the quality. I would definitely recommend it for a movie night with friends, or just a Sunday afternoon time-killer.    

fuckyeahdirectors:

Floria Sigismondi, Kristen Stewart, Dakota Fanning and Joan Jett

fuckyeahdirectors:

Floria Sigismondi, Kristen Stewart, Dakota Fanning and Joan Jett

234 notes

directingfilm:

image

[The Lone Ranger] posted a five-day opening of $48.9 million domestically, an abysmal number considering the film’s $250 million production budget and a worldwide marketing spend in the neighborhood of $175 million, the norm these days for many summer event pics.

77 notes

brothertedd:

On the set of Dr. Strangelove (1964), Stanley Kubrick plays chess with George C. Scott.

brothertedd:

On the set of Dr. Strangelove (1964), Stanley Kubrick plays chess with George C. Scott.

95 notes